Friday, July 22, 2016

From the Archives: Working with No Information

8 years later - I am astonished by how familiar this scenario still is.

------------------------------
March 5, 2008

In a stuffy meeting room, the manager(M) and the director(D) attempt to get some information out of the assigned subject matter expert.

The upper management has decreed that a department will be switching over to a new email system as a pilot for the rest of the university. However, the group within the university that is already using the new email system is not to be consulted in any way shape or form on this project. And no other resources are to be used.

The below scenario is a rough idea of what happened when the Manager and Director attempted to get information from the Subject Matter Expert for the pilot group.

----------------------------------------
M&D: So - what would you like to know about this application at the end of the training?

SME: I dunno

M&D: Well, how do you use the current email system?

SME: Well, we use it for email and stuff.

M&D: Just amongst yourselves? With outside groups? Other departments? Is this going to be your primary form of communication or an alternate form.

SME: I dunno

M&D have realized that they do not have the right subject matter expert and that they have no other folks that they are allowed to work with for the project. They plow forward.

M&D: Most of your folks are mobile and don't have a designated PC - how did you want them to access this email system?

SME: I guess they could find an open computer and look at it .(Note: there ARE no open computers the end users have access to. All computers require the person to log in and the majority of this end user population do not have network logins.)

M&D: Uh, 99.5% of the computers they have access to require a network login. Did you want to have your end users get a network login?

SME: No.

M&D: Are they going to use mobile devices?

SME: Nah - they should find a computer (Note: Though we are not sure what they are using, from observation we know that the majority of the end users have a mobile device of some sort.)

The Manager takes a note to find out what mobile device the end users are supposed to have assigned to them.

M&D: Are you going to use the calendar?

SME: I dunno

M&D: How many people are we going to need to train?

SME: Not sure. We haven't decided who is going to use this yet.

M&D restrain themselves from banging heads on table and/or strangling the SME.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Meanwhile, in a corner of the cube farm, the Instructional Designer stares at her monitor.

She knows that M&D have hit a brick wall. They cannot get the answers the team needs to develop useful training. The upper management has given a deadline of the end of the month to get this new email system "live" with the group they have selected for the pilot.

She also knows that this particular group of end users are not a tech-savvy bunch.

Thankfully - the Instructional Designer has used this email system before at another organization.

She takes a sip of her 3rd cup of coffee.

What did I want to know when I first looked at this system?

She stares at the monitor for a few more moments, then begins to scribble things on the steno pad by her left hand.
- Send email
- Find people
- Receive email
- Forward and Reply
- Delete
- Add attachments

She takes another sip of her coffee, grabs a Jolly Rancher Soft Chew (Cherry) from her desk, unwraps the candy and pops it in her mouth.
- If calendar then:
- Add appointments
- Move appointments
- Delete appointments

Satisfied that this is a reasonable start - she swallows the plasticine candy, opens Captivate, opens the email application and begins building the tutorials.

She'll make notes identifying knowledge gaps as she works.

The Instructional Designer knows that whatever she builds using these cursory guidelines may not be terribly useful for the project at hand. The tutorials will probably not be an example of textbook instructional design. But she know that the tutorials can serve as reference later and for other projects.

And, if nothing else, it looks like she's doing something proactive and useful.

No comments: